Comfort in Style: A Free Cardigan Knitting Pattern

Step into the world of fashion with this free cardigan knitting pattern that perfectly combines style and functionality. In this article, I’ll guide you through the process of creating a stunning cardigan that not only keeps you warm but also adds a touch of elegance to your outfit.

free cardigan knitting pattern

Commit to quality and style this year. This free cardigan pattern allows you to create a timeless piece that will become a staple in your wardrobe.

From choosing the right yarn to adding the perfect finishing touches, I’ll provide you with expert tips and tricks to help you create a cardigan that is both fashionable and comfortable. Whether you’re a seasoned knitter or a beginner looking to take on a your first big project, this pattern is suitable for all skill levels.

Let’s explore the world of knitting and fashion and discover how you can bring your own unique sense of style to this classic garment. Get ready to impress with fashion-forward cardigan that will turn heads wherever you go.

Choosing the right yarn: Solid colors versus variegated yarn

When it comes to knitting a cardigan, choosing the right yarn is crucial. Solid colors and variegated yarn both have their own unique charm, and the choice ultimately depends on the look you want to achieve.

Solid colors offer a classic and timeless appeal. They provide a clean and sophisticated look that can easily be paired with a variety of outfits. Solid color yarns also allow the textured yoke pattern to pop and shine, giving your cardigan a polished and professional finish.

On the other hand, variegated yarns add a profusion of color and visual interest to your cardigan. With their multiple shades and color transitions, variegated yarns create a vibrant and eye-catching garment. They can add a playful and whimsical touch to your outfit, perfect for making a statement or adding a touch of personality to your wardrobe.

When choosing between solid colors and variegated yarns, consider the occasion and your personal style. Solid colors are versatile and can be worn for both formal and casual events, while variegated yarns are great for adding a fun and unique element to your everyday outfits.

This free cardigan knitting pattern was designed with versatility in mind—so you can look great in whatever yarn you choose!

Fiber Seed Sprout DK Yarn Benefits

For this free cardigan pattern, I adored using Fiber Seed’s Sprout DK in the colorway Float On. This yarn is known for its exceptional quality with 75% American Merino and 25% nylon for a smooth, yet sturdy feel, making it the perfect choice for creating a cardigan you’ll want to wear every day.

One of the key benefits of Fiber Seed Sprout DK yarn is its softness. It is made from a custom blend of merino wool and nylon, giving its soft texture just a bit of a hardy crunch that still feels incredibly luxurious against the skin.

Another advantage of this yarn is its durability. The special blend used in Fiber Seed Sprout DK yarn is known for its strength and resilience, ensuring that your cardigan will last for years to come.

Fiber Seed Sprout DK yarn is available in a wide range of colors, from classic neutrals to vibrant hues. The yarn has a matte finish, which makes the saturated colors the star of the show. Fiber Seed’s wide range of hues allows you to choose the perfect shade to complement your personal style and create a cardigan that truly reflects your individuality.

free cardigan knitting pattern

Finishing Touches: Ribbing, Buttonholes, Blocking, & More!

To give your cardigan a polished and professional finish, attention to detail is key. Here are some important finishing touches to consider when knitting your cardigan.

I’ve created 2 versions of this free cardigan knitting pattern and experimented with different finishes each time. Check out these side by side photos and see the difference that a few finishing touches can make.

The pattern is written to the V1 specs, but the downloadable PDF (free when you sign up) contains modification notes on how to make it your own!

1. Ribbing: Ribbing is a common technique used in cardigan patterns to create a stretchy and snug edge. It adds structure and prevents the edges from rolling up. When knitting the ribbing, make sure to use a smaller needle size to achieve the desired tension.

V1. I used the super stretchy 1/1 ribbing & loved the look and feel.

V2. I substituted a 2/2 rib for equally gorgeous results!

2. Buttonholes: Buttonholes are essential for cardigans that feature buttons as closures. There are various methods for creating buttonholes, such as yarn overs or binding off stitches. Choose a method that suits your knitting style and the overall look of your cardigan.

V1. I did not make buttonholes and instead chose to wear this cardigan open. When I occasionally wanted to hold it closed, I would use a shawl pin at the top.

V2. I added button holes and found the perfect buttons to complement the yarn. It’s nice to have the option of wearing it open or closed—though fully closed is not the best look for my body type.

3. Worked Flat vs. In the Round: Cardigans are most typically worked flat due to the front opening. But due to stranded colorwork or other considerations, they can also be worked in the round and the steeked, aka cut, open.

V1. There was no way on earth I was steeking. Didn’t even cross my mind. And this worked out beautifully because the button band was integrated perfectly and it had the added benefit of being fully reversible.

V2. 80+ patterns later, I had knit myself into a repetitive stress injury—which rows and rows of purling would’ve triggered in a big way. Also, I’d steeked once before and learned it was nothing to be scared of. So I went for it! It made for a faster and more enjoyable knitting experience. Though since I was using variegated yarn, I wasn’t a huge fan of the colors running vertically on the button band when everywhere else the colors pooled horizontally.

4. Binding Off: Binding off is the way you choose to end your knit. You can choose from hundreds of ways to end your project. I tried two different ones on this free cardigan knitting pattern.

V1. I used a basic bind off for all my cuffs and hems.

V2. I used the lesser known invisible sewn bind off for 2/2 ribbing. I just love how it melts off the edge.

5. Blocking: Blocking is the process of shaping and setting your knitted garment to its final dimensions. It involves wetting the knitted piece and then gently moving it into shape. Blocking helps even out stitches, enhances the drape of the fabric, and gives your cardigan a professional and finished look.

It’s especially important for this cardigan as the knit/purl design, at its base, is ribbing and will pucker without proper coaxing. (No changes were made between V1 & V2.)

Tips and tricks for achieving a professional finish

Creating a cardigan that looks like it was made by a professional knitter requires attention to detail and some insider tips and tricks. Here are a few to help you achieve a polished finish:

1. Gauge swatch: Always knit a gauge swatch before starting your cardigan. This ensures that your finished garment will fit as intended and helps you adjust your knitting tension if needed.

2. Stitch markers: Use stitch markers to keep track of pattern repeats and important sections of your cardigan. This will help you avoid mistakes and ensure that your cardigan is symmetrical and well-structured.

3. Weaving in ends: Take the time to weave in ends as you go. This will save you from having to deal with a bunch of loose ends at the end of your project and give your cardigan a neat and professional appearance.

4. Blocking tools: Invest in blocking tools such as blocking mats, T-pins, and blocking wires. These tools make the blocking process easier and more effective, resulting in a beautifully finished cardigan.

Remember, practice makes perfect. Don’t be discouraged if your first attempt doesn’t turn out exactly as planned. Knitting is a skill that improves with time and experience. Embrace the process and enjoy the journey of creating your own fashion-forward cardigan.

free cardigan knitting pattern

Download the Complete Free Cardigan Knitting Pattern PDF

Like to have your patterns beautifully laid out in an easily accessible way? I get it! Download Copper Rain, the free cardigan knitting pattern, complete schematic and 2 pages of notes on how to modify the pattern to get the perfect fit every time.

All you have to do is sign up for my newsletter! You’ll receive emails once or twice a month to announce new patterns (with special subscriber sales), new free patterns, and more!

Just sign up in the box below and you’ll receive access to this PDF pattern and so many more.

What You’ll Need for the Free Cardigan Knitting Pattern

Sizes:
1 (2, 3, 4, 5) (6, 7, 8, 9)

Finished Bust: 34 (38, 41, 46, 50) [55, 59, 63, 67]”/86.5 (96.5, 104, 117, 127) [139.5, 150, 160, 170] cm

Yarn:
1300 (1400, 1550, 1700, 1900) (2100, 2300, 2450, 2650) yards/1200 (1300, 1400, 1550, 1700) (1950, 2100, 2250, 2400) meters in a DK weight

Suggested Yarn:
The Fiber Seed’s Sprout DK (90% Merino Wool, 10% Nylon) 250 yds/230m, 100g – 6 (6, 7, 7, 8) [9, 10, 10, 11] skeins in Float On

Suggested Needles:
US 6/4.00 mm, 40” circular and preferred needles for small circumference knitting

Gauge:

22.5 sts and 32 rows = 4”/10 cm in stockinette, after blocking

Notions:
Stitch markers, stitch holders or waste yarn, tapestry needle

Techniques to Indulge In:
Ribbing, knit/purl textures, make one increases, (optional) short rows

free cardigan knitting pattern

Glossary for Free Cardigan Knitting Pattern

BO – bind off

CO – cast on

K – knit

k2tog – knit 2 stitches together

LLI – left lifted increase – Using the LN, pick up the stitch below the stitch just knit on the righthand needle. Knit the stitch. 

M1R – make one right – Insert the left needle from back to front into the horizontal bar between your last worked stitch and the next stitch to be worked. Knit the front leg of the loop (which twists the bar to the right).

M1L – make one left – Insert the left needle from front to back into the horizontal bar between your last worked stitch and the next stitch to be worked. Knit the back leg of the loop (which twists the bar to the left).

P – purl

patt – pattern

PU&K – pick up and knit

rep – repeat

RLI – right lifted increase – Using the righthand needle, pick up the stitch below the next stitch on the LN and place it on the LN. Knit the stitch. 

sl – slip number of stitches purlwise unless otherwise indicated

ssk – one at a time, slip the next 2 sts knitwise; return the sts to the lefthand needles, and knit them together through the back loops

w&t – wrap and turn – For a great and simple video on how to wrap and turn, check out Very Pink Knits’ video called Knitting Help – Wrap and Turn (w&t). Also check out her accompanying video called Knitting Help – Picking up Wraps

1/1RC – Slip 1 st to cable needle and hold in back, k1, then k1 from cable needle

1/1LC – Slip 1 st to cable needle and hold in front, k1, then k1 from cable needle

Copper Rain Cardigan: The Free Pattern

Placket

The placket will be worked in the first and last 9 sts of each row. For the ease of reading the pattern, I’ll write the instructions once here and you will begin and end each row with the following 1×1 ribbing.

WS Row: Sl 1, * p1, k1, rep from * 3 more times, work in patt to the last 9 sts, * k1, p1, rep from * 3 more times, sl 1.

RS Row: K1, * k1, p1, rep from * 3 more times, work in patt to the last 9 sts, * p1, k1, rep from * 3 more times, k1.

Would you like to add buttons? Work the Collar for 5 rows, then sub in these sts on the placket:

RS Button Row: K2, p1, k1, p1, BO 2, k1, p1, work in patt to the last 9 sts, * p1, k1, rep from * 3 more times, k1.

WS Button Row: Sl 1, * p1, k1, rep from * 3 more times, work in patt to the last 9 sts, p1, k1, CO 2, p1, k1, p1, k1, sl 1.

Rep Button Rows every 2”/5 cm for the desired number of buttons.

Collar

Using US 6 needles, CO 103 (109, 115, 119, 121) [123, 127, 131, 135]—which includes the placket stitches. Place markers after the first and before the last 9 sts to mark the two plackets which you’ll work at the beginning and end of each row, begin the pattern:

Row 1 (WS): * P1, k1, rep from * to last st, p1.

Row 2 (RS): * K1, p1 rep from * to last st, k1.

Rep Rows 1 & 2 for 1”/2.5 cm, end after completing a Row 1.

free cardigan knitting pattern

Set Up for Yoke

Stitch count does not include the 18 placket stitches.

Size 1:

Row 1 (RS): K5, k2tog, * k7, k2tog, rep from * 7 more times, k6 — 76 sts.

Size 2:

Row 1 (RS): K across — 91 sts.

Size 3:

Row 1 (RS): K2tog, k to end — 96 sts.

Size 4:

Row 1 (RS): K5, * M1R, k7, rep from * 12 more times, M1R, k5 — 115 sts.

Size 5:

Row 1 (RS): K4, * M1R, k8, rep from * 11 more times, M1R, k3 — 116 sts.

Size 6:

Row 1 (RS): K14, * M1R, k26, rep from * 2 more times, M1R, k13 — 109 sts.

Row 2 (WS): P across.

Row 3: * K2, M1R, k2 rep from * to last st, k1 — 136 sts.

Size 7:

Row 1 (RS): * K2, M1R, k2 rep from * to last st, k1 — 136 sts.

Row 2 (WS): P across.

Row 3: * K3, M1R, k2 rep from * to last st, k1 — 163 sts.

Size 8:

Row 1 (RS): K7, * M1R, k9, rep from * 10 more times, M1R, k7 — 125 sts.

Row 2 (WS): P across.

Row 3: * K2, M1R, k2 rep from * to last st, k1 — 156 sts.

Size 9:

Row 1 (RS): K10, * M1R, k14, rep from * 6 more times, M1R, k9 — 125 sts.

Row 2 (WS): P across.

Row 3: * K2, M1R, k2 rep from * to last st, k1 — 156 sts.

Row 4: P across.

Row 5: * K3, M1R, k2 rep from * to last st, k1 — 187 sts.

Yoke of the Free Cardigan Knitting Pattern

All sizes resume.

Row 1 (WS): P across.

Short Row Section 1

Note: I’ve added two short row sections at the top and the bottom of the yoke to tilt the back of the neck up and the front of the neck forward. If you prefer the neck to set even, you can skip the two short row sections.

Short Row 1 (RS): K46 (54, 56, 66, 66) [76, 90, 86, 102], w&t.

Short Row 2 (WS): P16 (17, 16, 17, 16) [16, 17, 16, 17], w&t.

Short Row 3: K to previous w&t, k and its wrap, k5, w&t.

Short Row 4: P to previous w&t, p and its wrap, p5, w&t.

Rep Short Rows 3 & 4 two more times.

Upper Yoke

For Rows 2-41:

Sizes 1, 3, 5, 6, and 8 follow instructions outside the parentheses

(Sizes 2, 4, 7, and 9 follow instructions inside the parentheses)

Row 2 (RS): K1, (M1L,) k across – 76 (92, 96, 116, 116) [136, 164, 156, 188] sts.

Row 3 (WS): P across.

Row 4: * K2 (3), p2, k1, rep from * to last st, k1 (2).

Row 5: * P2 (3), K2, p1, rep from * to last st, p1 (2).

Row 6: * K2 (3), M1R, k2, M1L, k1, rep from * to last st, k1 (2) – 106 (122, 134, 154, 162) [190, 218, 218, 250] sts.

Rows 7, 9 & 11: P across.

Rows 8 & 10: K across.

Row 12: * K2 (3), M1R, p4, M1L, k1, rep from * to last st, k1 (2) – 136 (152, 172, 192, 208) [244, 272, 280, 312] sts.

Row 13 & 15: * P3 (4), k4, p2, rep from * to last st, p1 (2).

Row 14: * K3 (4), p4, k2, rep from * to last st, k1 (2).

Row 16: * K3 (4), M1R, k4, M1L, k2, rep from * to last st, k1 (2) – 166 (182, 210, 230, 254) [298, 326, 342, 374] sts.

Rows 17, 19, 21 & 23: P across.

Rows 18, 20 & 22: K across.

Row 24: * K3 (4), M1R, p6, M1L, k2, rep from * to last st, k1 (2) – 196 (212, 248, 268, 300) [352, 378, 404, 436] sts.

Row 25, 27, 29 & 31: * P4 (5), K6, p3, rep from * to last st, p1 (2).

Row 26, 28, & 30: * K4 (5), p6, k3, rep from * to last st, k1 (2).

Row 32: * K4 (5), M1R, p6, M1L, k3, rep from * to last st, k1 (2) – 226 (242, 286, 306, 346) [406, 434, 466, 498] sts.

Row 33, 35, 37, 39 & 41: P across.

Row 34, 36, 38 & 40: K across.

Want to Fade the Blocks Straight Into Your Sleeve?

I love the look of fading the yoke blocks straight into the sleeve blocks, but adding this simple change turns the pattern instructions sooooooo long that they become confusing. If keeping the block going is not your thing or you’d like simple stockinette sleeves, no worries! Follow the pattern as written.

If you’d like to take your blocks straight into the sleeves, then place a markers at the beginning and end of the 4 (4, 5, 5, 6) [7, 7, 8, 8]th repeat on either side of the placket. These repeats will be centered over your sleeves.

Beginning on Row 52, for the marked repeats only,

Sleeve Block RS Row: * Work in patt to m, k5 (6, 4, 6, 5) [5, 6, 5, 6], p8, k4, rep from * 1 time, work in patt to end.

Sleeve Block WS Row: * Work in patt to m, sm, p4, k8, p5 (6, 4, 6, 5) [5, 6, 5, 6], sm, rep from * 1 time, work in patt to end.

Work the Sleeve Blocks for a total of 10 rows, then work in stockinette for 10 rows. Continue in the pattern through the yoke and into the sleeves.

free cardigan knitting pattern

Middle Yoke

Sizes 1, 5, 6, and 8 ONLY:

Row 42 (RS): * K4, M1R, p8, M1L, k3, rep from * to last st, k1 – 256 (-, -, -, 392) [460, -, 528, -] sts.

Row 43 (WS): * P5, k8, p4, rep from * to last st, p1.

Rows 44, 46, 48 & 50: * K5, p8, k4, rep from * to last st, k1.

Rows 45, 47, 49 & 51: * P5, K8, p4, rep from * to last st, p1.

Row 52: * K4, 1/1 RC, p6, 1/1 LC, k3, rep from * to last st, k1.

Row 53: * P6, k6, p5, rep from * to last st, p1.

Row 54: * K5, 1/1 RC, p4, 1/1 LC, k4, rep from * to last st, k1.

Row 55: * P7, k4, p6, rep from * to last st, p1.

Row 56: * K6, 1/1 RC, p2, 1/1 LC, k5, rep from * to last st, k1.

Row 57: * P8, k2, p7, rep from * to last st, p1.

Row 58: * K7, 1/1 RC, 1/1 LC, k6, rep from * to last st, k1.

Size 3 ONLY:

Row 42 (RS): * K4, p8, M1L, k3, rep from * to last 16 stitches, k4, p8, k4 – 304 sts.

Row 43 (WS): * P4, k8, p4, rep from * to end.

Row 44, 46, 48 & 50: * K4, p8, k4, rep from * to end.

Row 45, 47, 49 & 51: * P4, k8, p4, rep from * to end.

Row 52: * K3, 1/1 RC, p6, 1/1 LC, k3, rep from * to end.

Row 53: * P5, k6, p5, rep from * to end.

Row 54: * K4, 1/1 RC, p4, 1/1 LC, k4, rep from * to end.

Row 55: * P6, k4, p6, rep from * to end.

Row 56: * K5, 1/1 RC, p2, 1/1 LC, k5, rep from * to end.

Row 57: * P7, k2, p7, rep from * to end.

Row 58: * K6, 1/1 RC, 1/1 LC, k5, rep from * to end.

Sizes 2, 4, 7, and 9 ONLY:

Row 42 (RS): *K5, M1R, p8, M1L, k3, rep from * to last 2 sts, k2- -(272, -, 344,-) [-, 488, -, 560] sts.

Row 43 (WS): * P6, k8, p4, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Row 44, 46, 48 & 50: * K6, p8, k4, rep from * to last 2 sts, k2.

Row 45, 47, 49 & 51: * P6, k8, p4, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Row 52: * K5, 1/1 RC, p6, 1/1 LC, k3, rep from * to last 2 sts, k2.

Row 53: * P7, k6, p5, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Row 54: * K6, 1/1 RC, p4, 1/1 LC, k4, rep from * to last 2 sts, k2.

Row 55: * P8, k4, p6, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Row 56: * K7, 1/1 RC, p2, 1/1 LC, k5, rep from * to last 2 sts, k2.

Row 57: * P9, K2, p7, rep from * to last 2 sts, p2.

Row 58: * K8, 1/1 RC, 1/1 LC, K7, rep from * to last 2 sts. K2.

All Sizes Resume:

Row 59 (WS): P across – stop to check 256 (272, 304, 344, 392) [460, 488, 528, 560] sts.

Short Row Section 2

Note: This will tilt the neck up an additional inch for a 2-inch total. But again, if you’re not interested in the tilted neck, you can proceed to Row 60.

Remember not to count the button band or you’ll have an off-center short row section.

Short Row 1 (RS): K160 (170, 190, 215, 246) [288, 305, 330, 350], w&t.

Short Row 2 (WS): P64 (68, 76, 86, 98) [116, 122, 132, 140], w&t.

Short Row 3: K to previous w&t, k and its wrap, K8, w&t.

Short Row 4: P to previous w&t, p and its wrap, P8, w&t.

Rep Short Rows 3 & 4 two more times.

Lower Yoke

If working the the Sleeve Block Fade, then don’t forget to purl the 8 sts at the center of your markers for 10 rows every 10 rows!

Row 60 (RS): K across.

Row 61 (WS): P across.

Cont working Rows 60 & 61 until Yoke reaches 8.5 (9, 9.5, 10, 10.5) [11, 11.5, 12, 12.5]“/21.5 (23, 24, 25.5, 26.5) [28, 29, 30.5, 32] cm from CO edge (measured from the front where there are no short-rows).

Arm and Body Division

Note: For the mid-row cast on, you can use whichever cast on you prefer, but I recommend the Cable Cast On without twisting the stitches. This creates a strong cast on line to attach your body and sleeves. To further strengthen this connection, I create one extra loop, which I do not place on the needle, but instead I pick up the next stitch after the arm stitch as if to knit and feed the extra loop through that stitch.

Reminder: For those working flat, continue working the WS and RS Placket Rows on the first and last 9 sts of each row. These stitches are not counted in the division row.

Division Row (RS): K35 (39, 44, 51, 58) [67, 71, 77, 82], place 50 (50, 56, 62, 73) [89, 94, 103, 108] sts on stitch holder, CO 14 (16, 16, 15, 13) [8, 11, 11, 11] sts, k86 (94, 104, 118, 130) [148, 158, 168, 180], place 50 (50, 56, 62, 73) [89, 94, 103, 108] sts on stitch holder, CO 14 (16, 16, 15, 13) [8, 11, 11, 11] sts, k35 (39, 44, 51, 58) [67, 71, 77, 82] — 184 (204, 224, 250, 272) [298, 322, 344, 366] sts.

Body of the Free Carigan Knitting Pattern

Row 1 (WS): P across.

Row 2 (RS): K across.

Repeat Rows 1 & 2 for 13”/33 cm from the Underarm CO, or 3”/7.5 cm less than desired length.

Personal Note: After about 4”/10 cm, I worked one sleeve. Then I returned to the body, worked another 4”/10 cm, and then I worked the second sleeve. I did this for several reasons: to switch things up to keep from getting bored, to avoid sleeve island at the end of the project, and to ensure that I wouldn’t end up short of yarn at the end. It worked like a dream!

Trim

Set Up Row (WS): * P1, k1, rep from * to 3 sts before placket begins, p1, k2tog

Row 1 (RS): * K1, p1, rep from * to end.

Row 2: * P1, k1, rep from * to end.

Rep Rows 1 & 2 for 3”/7.5 cm. BO in pattern.

free cardigan knitting pattern

Sleeves (Make 2)

Set Up Round Note: If it makes sense (or makes fewer holes) to pick up more stitches at the beginning and end of this row, be sure to decrease to a total of your size’s stitches in the next row. AND marker is only placed in the Set Up Round for those working the Block Sleeves.

Set Up Round: Beginning at the center of the underarm, PU&K 7 (8, 8, 8, 7) [4, 5, 6, 5] sts, k25 (25, 28, 31, 36) [44, 47, 51, 54], pm, k25 (25, 28, 31, 37) [45, 47, 52, 54], PU&K 7 (8, 8, 8, 6) [3, 5, 5, 5] sts — 64 (66, 72, 78, 86) [96, 104, 114, 118] sts.

Marker should be centered with the 8-stitch purl square on the yoke above. If for some reason it is not, move your marker so that 4 purl stitches can be placed on each side. Remove the other block makers.

Decrease Round: K1, k2tog, follow instructions for current row to the last three stitches, ssk, k1 – 2 sts dec’d.

The Decrease Round will be worked every 1.25 (1.5, 1.25, 1.25, 1) [0.75, 0.5, 0.5, 0.75]”/3 (4, 3, 3, 2.5) [2, 1.5, 1.5, 2] cm for an additional 9 (8, 10, 11, 15) [19, 23, 25, 23] times while working the sleeve pattern concurrently, ending with 44 (48, 48, 52, 52) [56, 56, 60, 64] sts. The Decrease Round effects only the first and last 3 sts; the rest of the rounds can follow either pattern:

Stockinette Sleeves

Simply knit around! Work Dec Rounds as indicated.

Block Sleeves

Continue working the blocks in pattern down the length of the sleeve. Ex., if you’ve already purled 4 rounds/rows them begin on Round 5.

Rounds 1-10: K to 4 sts before marker, p8, k to end.

Rounds 11-20: K around.

Rep Rounds 1-20 five more times or until the sleeve reaches 15”/38 cm (or 3”/7.5 cm less than the desired length).

Cuff

Round 1: * P1, K1, rep from * to the end of the round.

Rep Round 1 for 3”/7.5 cm. BO in pattern.

Finishing the Free Cardigan Knitting Pattern

Weave in ends and block to measurements. Then enjoy!

If you share photos of your Nurture Knitwear projects, please be sure to tag me @nurtureknitwear and use the hashtags #nurtureknitwear and #copperraincardigcan.

Love Your Free Cardigan Knitting Pattern

Knitting a cardigan is a rewarding and fulfilling project that allows you to express your creativity and showcase your knitting skills. With this free cardigan knitting pattern, you have the opportunity to create a garment that seamlessly blends fashion and functionality.

Whether you choose solid colors or variegated yarns, the key is to select a yarn that suits your personal style and complements your wardrobe. Fiber Seed Sprout DK yarn offers a luxurious feel and exceptional quality, making it an excellent choice for your cardigan project.

By paying attention to the finishing touches such as ribbing, buttonholes, and blocking, you can elevate your cardigan to a professional level. Don’t forget to incorporate the tips and tricks we’ve shared to achieve a polished and refined finish.

With the right materials, techniques, and a little bit of patience, you can create a cardigan that not only keeps you warm but also turns heads wherever you go. Embrace the art of knitting, unleash your creativity, and enjoy the satisfaction of wearing a handmade garment that truly reflects your unique sense of style. Happy knitting!

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